• Raymond Mansi

Understanding Crime Statistics

We’ve made it quick and convenient for you to get the statistics you need!


Crime statistics can show us trends and what is going on where we live. This blog will help you learn what these numbers mean. For this blog we will be using crime statistics that we have posted on our NVCrimeMapping.com website. The following can be found under the UCR Services tab under the Quarterly Statistic Reports.


The first link we can click on is Agency Submission Status by Quarter. If you click on that link it will show us quarterly submissions by agencies across the state. There are three types of reports: Domestic Violence, UCR and Elderly. We will be taking a look at those reports as we progress but first we will see who submitted these reports. If there is a “X” in a field that means that we received that report by that agency. Boulder City PD has a “X” in every field for every report in quarter 4 which means we got all three reports each month. If you look down at the Fire Marshall submissions that only field that does not have a “X” was the December UCR which means we did not receive that report. Underneath each report we have the numbers and percentages of reports received. For Quarter 4 we saw 80.9% of October Domestic Violence reports submitted followed up by a decrease of 72.3% of November Domestic Violence reports submitted.


The second link UCR Crime Data by Quarter has the quarterly breakdown of crimes reported in the state of Nevada for the year 2017. The first page has the year to date totals. As you can see there is quite a bit of information you can collect by looking at the UCR report. For this example we will take a look and learn more about robberies that took place in the state in 2017. On page 2 we have quarterly numbers for robberies that occurred. We can see that in quarter 1 there was 1,147 robberies that took place. We also can break down the type of robberies that took place. There were 506 by firearm, 110 by knife, 138 other, and 393 strong-arm robberies in quarter 1. On page 3 we will continue to take a look at quarter 1 robberies. Under “Actual Offenses” we can see that there were 1,144 robberies. They are broken down to where they were located: highway, commercial house, gas station, convenience store, residence, bank, miscellaneous. Also, we can see the value of property stolen in each quarter as well as to which type of robbery. On page 8 we can see the number of robberies committed by males and females under the age of 18 by each quarter. In quarter 1 there were 22 robberies committed by 17 year olds. Pages 9-21 continue to take a look at crimes broken down by the age of the offender. Pages 22-33 give us a look at the amount of crimes per quarter that are committed by what races and ethnicities. Looking at these stats is similar to what we have been looking at. From left to right you can see quarters 1-4 and then a year to date total. Page 34 lets us see how many arson reports were filed and what type of property was damaged as a result. We have police employees and human trafficking summaries to conclude the quarterly UCR breakdown.

The third link UCR Crime Data by Month is similar to what we saw in the previous link but this time it breaks it down more by month instead of by the quarter. We just went through looking at robberies by quarter. We saw that there were 1,147 robberies in quarter 1 of 2017 and now we can see how many robberies occurred in each month on page 2 of this report. In January 2017 there were 467 robberies, 336 robberies in February and 344 robberies in Mach. In quarter 1 there was $2,894,042 worth of property recovered. If we look at the monthly breakdown we will see that $1,763,617 was recovered in January. There are instances where a bulk of what happened in a quarter occurred in one moth or maybe there are times were one month had significantly less reported than the other two months.


The fourth link is labeled Domestic Violence by Month and Quarter. When opened we can take a look at the number of domestic violence crimes committed in Nevada for the year 2017. Each offense is reported to the day they were committed. On March 8th, 2017 there was 55 domestic violence crimes reported in the state on that date. There are totals for each month and a yearly total for the offenses in the state. Also, we can see that in quarter 3 we had the most domestic violence crimes reported, and in quarter 4 we had the least amount of domestic violence crimes reported.


The fifth link is Crimes Against Older Persons by Month and Quarter. An older person is anyone over the age of 60. As you can see there are five different categories that a crime against an older person can be categorized as. The categories are as followed: abuse, neglect, exploitation, isolation, abandonment.


Below are the definitions for each category:


· Abuse means willful:

(a) Infliction of pain or injury on an older person or a vulnerable person;

(b) Deprivation of food, shelter, clothing or services which are necessary to maintain the physical or mental health of an older person or a vulnerable person;

(c) Infliction of psychological or emotional anguish, pain or distress on an older person or a vulnerable person through any act, including, without limitation:


i. Threatening, controlling or socially isolating the older or vulnerable person;

ii. Disregarding the needs of the older person or vulnerable person; or

iii. Harming, damaging or destroying any property of the older person or vulnerable person, including, without limitation, pets;


(d) Nonconsensual sexual contact with an older person or vulnerable person, including, without limitation:


i. An act that the older person or vulnerable person is unable to understand or to which the older person or vulnerable person is unable to communicate his or her objection; or

ii. Intentional touching, either directly or through the clothing, of the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh or buttocks of the older person or vulnerable person; or


(e) Permitting any of the acts described in paragraphs (a) to (d), inclusive, to be committed against an older person or a vulnerable person.


· Neglect: The failure of a person or a manager of a facility who has assumed legal responsibility or a contractual obligation for caring for an older person or a vulnerable person or who has voluntarily assumed responsibility for his or her care to provide food, shelter, clothing or services which are necessary to maintain the physical or mental health of the older person or vulnerable person.


· Exploitation: Any act taken by a person who has the trust and confidence of an older person or a vulnerable person or any use of the power of attorney or guardianship of an older person or vulnerable person to :


(a) Obtain control, through deception, intimidation or undue influence, over the older person’s or vulnerable person’s money, assets or property with the intention of permanently depriving the older person or vulnerable person of the ownership, use, benefit or possession of his or her money, assets or property ; or


(b) Convert money, assets or property of the older person or vulnerable person with the intention of permanently depriving the older person or vulnerable person of the ownership, use, benefit or possession of his or her money, assets or property.


As used in this subsection, “undue influence” means the improper use of power or trust in a way that deprives a person of his or her free will and substitutes the objectives of another person. The term does not include the normal influence that one member of a family has over another.


· Isolation: Preventing an older person or a vulnerable person from having contact with another person by:


(a) Intentionally preventing the older person or vulnerable person from receiving visitors, mail or telephone calls, including without limitation, communicating to a person who comes to visit the older person or vulnerable person or a person who telephones the older person or vulnerable person that the older person or vulnerable person is not present or does not want to meet with or talk to visitor or caller knowing that the statement is false, contrary to the express wishes of the older or vulnerable person and intended to prevent the older person or vulnerable person from having contact with the visitor;


(b) Physically restraining the older person or vulnerable person to prevent the older person or vulnerable person from meeting with a person who comes to visit the older person or vulnerable person; or


(c) Permitting any of the acts described in paragraph (a) and (b) to be committed against an older person or a vulnerable person.


The term does not include an act intended to protect the property or physical or mental welfare of the older person or vulnerable person or an act performed pursuant to the instructions of a physician of the older person or vulnerable person.


· Abandonment: (a) Desertion of an older person or a vulnerable person in an unsafe manner by a caretaker or other person with a legal duty of care; or

(b) Withdrawal of necessary assistance owned to an older person or a vulnerable person by a caretaker or other person with an obligation to provide services to the other older person or vulnerable person.


SOUCE FOR THESE DEFITIONS IS NRS 200.5092


Similar to the domestic violence reports we have monthly, quarterly, and yearly totals for each category and grand totals from crimes against people over 60.


Hopefully you have a better understanding of crime statistics and how to look at UCR, Domestic Violence, and Elderly reports on NVCrimeMapping.com


#NVCrimeMapping #NevadaCrimeReporting



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This project was supported by Grant No. 15-NCS-X-02 (NIBRS) 2015-R2-CX-K043 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the US Department of Justice.

© 2019  by UCR Program 

If you have questions or need additional information please Email at nocrequest@dps.state.nv.us

Site last updated on:   Decemcber 3,  2019